The objectivity and subjectivity of wine judging

With a vast exposure in international wine judging, Lim Hwee Peng, CSW, FWS, an invited International Wine Judge for The Adelaide Review Hot 100 South Australian Wines, offers his perspective on this unique South Australia wine competition.

With a vast exposure in international wine judging, Lim Hwee Peng, CSW, FWS, an invited International Wine Judge for The Adelaide Review Hot 100 South Australian Wines, offers his perspective on this unique South Australia wine competition.

One of the many professional tasks that German Master Sommelier, Frank Kaemmer has to complete is to review wines for the Gault Millau Wine Guide. On average, more than 12,000 bottles of wines, divided among a dozen wine professionals, are tasted and reviewed annually.

Thus, for Kaemmer, the quantity of wines being delivered to his apartment for reviewing were in the hundreds; and according to him, his residence can potentially look like a wine warehouse at times, as the quantity of samples flowing in can be unbearable. Nevertheless, the professional in him ensures that appropriate space, effort and time were applied to review the wines objectively.

On a regular basis, after having satisfied himself on the outcome of his evaluation, he will inevitably keep a few bottles that he would like to enjoy during his meal time; more importantly to be at peace with his beautiful wife for putting up with the mess in their home.

However, what was surprising is the measurement Kaemmer placed on the well-rated ones to be featured in the Gault Millau Wine Guide vis-à-vis: those he kept aside for his enjoyment

“The favourably-rated wines were those that met the technical evaluation in their category,” the German Master Sommelier explains, “however, those that I put aside met my ‘enjoyment metre’.” I couldn’t agree more.

 

Adelaide In-depth

Get the latest stories, insights and exclusive giveaways delivered straight to your inbox every week.

X